Add Student Checklists to “HyperDrawings” Using Newly Integrated Google Keep

HyperDocs have been all the rage for the last couple years. My favorite G Suite tool for hyperDoc creation has always been Google Drawings. I create text boxes with opportunities for students to activate prior knowledge, engage, create, reflect, self-assess, and extend their learning within the margins or “gutter” outside of the canvas. However, there are so many steps in some of my hyperDocs that I have noticed students may accidentally skip part of their assignment. Alas, Google Keep came in to the rescue when it became fully integrated within Google Drawings!

Why Google Drawings for “HyperDocs”?

HyperDocs is the umbrella term for any tool within the G Suite Application that allows you to create inquiry-based, self-paced, differentiated student assignments. I really enjoy Google Drawings as it allows students to manipulate shapes and images in order to create a visual presentation. It also allows teachers to add video clips, directions in the margins or “gutter”, and Google Keep Notes. This really makes Google Keep a “one-stop-shop” for many of my activities.

Why Use Google Keep with HyperDrawings

Here’s an example of a hyperDrawing I created for students to learn about and create line-plots. Notice how Google Keep appears along-side the right margin. Immediately, I started integrating Google Keep as a simple way for students to track their progress as they complete their hyperDrawing. Students may check off each step or activity as it is completed. Once finished, students may then save their image as a JPG and upload their final product to the Google Keep Note. Finally, I can archive my feedback by creating hashtags for the assignments and student names.

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Step 1: Create the checklist in Google Keep

Step 2: Label the student and assignment name

Step 3: Add the student as the collaborator

Step 4: The student opens Google Drawings and then goes to Tools-Google Keep

Step 5: The student checks off tasks and assignments as they are completed.

Step 6: The student saves their Google Drawing as a JPEG and then uploads the image to the Google Keep Note.

Step 7: The teacher provides feedback and archives the notes.

In Summary

There are so many innovative and amazing ways to use Google Keep. Sometimes you just need to use the tool for what it was originally created for…….a task list 🙂

Do your students use a checklist while completing hyperDocs?

Do Your BookSnaps Seem Flat or Disorganized? Spice Up and Organize BookSnaps Using Google Drawings while adding GIFs, Bitmojis, and Word Art to Code Text!

What are BookSnaps?

BookSnaps is a term used for annotated digital snapshots taken by students while reading texts. Popular apps for BookSnaps include SnapChat, Seesaw, Instagram, and Explain Everything. Tara Martin is one popular educator credited for coining the phrase “BookSnaps” and sharing her fabulous BookSnap ideas all over Social Media.

Do your BookSnaps seem flat or disorganized?

Use Google Drawings to help students stay organized while promoting creativity!  Use animated GIFs from Sticky Al app, or add images using Google Search or the Bitmoji Chrome Extension. And, don’t forget how simple it is to use Word Art to code the Text! Or, if you have never created BookSnaps, consider starting your journey using Google Drawings!

Google Drawings is my favorite tool for a number of reasons:

  1. Students may collaborate on BookSnaps using the Share Tool.
  2. Students may provide and receive feedback using the Comment Tool.
  3. Google Drawings saves in the Cloud.
  4. Students may use the Explore Tool to locate images and research topics.
  5. A Key for coding the text can be provided in the margin or “gutter”.
  6. Bitmojis are easily integrated using Chrome Extensions.
  7. Insert animated GIFs or captioned student-created images Using Sticky Al App.
  8. Students can use the Screencastify Extension to explain and record thinking about their BookSnaps.
  9. Students can “Turn In” their work using Google Classroom.
  10. Teachers can “Make a Copy” of a template for every student or differentiate by modifying templates to meet individual needs.

Example BookSnap With ANIMATED GIF! Click Image to View

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Student Created Stickers for Annotating Text

Students may create their own images  or ANIMATED GIFs by using the amazing FREE apps such as Sticky Al. Sticky Al allows students to create their own selfie-stickers and GIFs that may be used with Google Drawings by:

  1. Using the Free Sticky Al on iPad to take photos using various facial expressions and gestures to use in the reading responses. (I recommend students model being surprised, angry, sad, happy, confused, and also using hand gestures. Then add fun labels to express the thoughts.)
  2. Uploading images into Google Drive and placing them in a folder. Students may now use the images for the rest of the year. They would only have to do this once!

Go to Insert-Image to locate student-created images and insert them to BookSnaps.

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You can even caption the images or customize animated GIFs right in the Sticky Al App! Awesome!

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Google Drawings BookSnap Template (Click and Make a Copy)

booksnaps template

Here is a template you may wish to use with students.  I provided the Bitmojis for my students using the Chrome Extension as they are too young to have their own Bitmoji accounts. I would provide both male and female Bitmojis so students may select the desired gender. But, ultimately, student-created images using the Sticky Al app would be the way to go! Click the image above to create your own copy and modify as needed.

Video Tutorial

Summary

In Summary, I think Google Drawings allows teachers and students to stay highly organized by inserting a coding key and distributing assignments using Google Classroom. The ability to work in the Cloud while collaborating with group members is also a key to engaging students. Immediate feedback using the Commenting Tool is surely a way to allow students to revise and reflect with peers and educators. Throw in some animated student-created GIFs and Bitmojis and you have a winner!

Promote Creativity and Collaboration by Creating Comic Strips Using Google Drawings

These days, there are dozens of apps and websites available for creating and integrating comic strips into the classroom using characters and scenery provided by the designers. But do students really need these websites? Why not have them create their own comic strips using Google Drawings!

Why Google Drawings?

  • Collaboration: Students may share their comic strip and collaborate with a partner and receive instant feedback using the Comment tool.
  • Research: Students may use the EXPLORE tool to continue researching their topic.
  • Creativity: Students may customize their comic strips without being limited to the software’s permissions.
  • Convenience: Comic strips will automatically be saved into the student’s Google Drive without hassle.
  • Cost: It’s FREE.

EXAMPLE

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5 Creative Ideas for Using Comics in the Classroom

  1. Health: Students create scenarios explaining how to react during certain situations. For example: They can create informational comic strips explaining how to react to bullying, peer pressure or stress.
  2. Math: Students create and solve word problems while explaining their thought process. For example: Students create a comic strip applying a number sentence to a real life scenario.
  3. ELA: Students may retell or summarize a story. Or, dig deeper to summarize characters traits, problems, conflicts, or resolutions within their reading assignment. Students could even create a comic strip to demonstrate understanding of unfamiliar vocabulary terms. For example: Students create a comic strip reenacting a scene that provides evidence of the main character’s internal character traits.
  4. Science: Students explain a science concept. For example: Students create a comic strip explaining the water cycle.
  5. Social Studies: Students could summarize a historical event or reasons for immigration. They could discuss a region’s features, economy, location, agriculture or landforms. For example: Students create a comic strip with a character discussing the landforms found in the region.

Resources

Sticky App: Create clear background selfies. Turn selfies into stickers!

Google Drawings Cartoon Templates- Feel free to modify and share!

 

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Go Digital with Morning Meeting Walls

Coaching Question: Is there a way to digitalize my Morning Meeting wall so I that I may save wall space?

Yes!

Many elementary school teachers are familiarizing themselves with the Responsive Classroom approach and using a Morning Meeting to start the day. The Morning Meeting is a great way to start the day, engage students and promote a sense of community within your classroom. However, the Morning Meeting bulletin board can take up a lot of space leaving little room for student work, instructional materials or anchor charts!

Example Morning Meeting Bulletin Board:

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The Solution: Go Digital

If you have a projector then definitely go digital! By having a digital Morning Meeting wall, you are not only saving space but you also allowing students to:

  1. Collaborate by adding questions
  2. Archive information to review as the year progresses
  3. Read teacher posts (and of course Bitmojis)
  4. Edit/Revise questions for the meeting
  5. Publish learning
  6. Share with parents, co-teachers, administrators, and collaborators

Plus, you don’t need to have the Morning Meeting wall projected on your whiteboard all day. Bookmark the digital Morning Meeting wall and pull it up on your whiteboard as needed throughout the day. And, share the wall with students via Google Classroom, Seesaw, e-mail etc. to have the reflect, comment, or collaborate on the digital bulletin board.

Example (Click to View)

Can you find the interactive links in this Morning Meeting Wall? (Click the image)

morning meeting wall

Need more ideas?

If you’d like more ideas for your Morning Meeting wall, check out this link with ideas for the K-2 and 3-6 classrooms.

Do you use a wall for your Morning Meeting?

 

 

 

 

Digital Morning Meeting Walls

Many elementary school teachers are familiarizing themselves with the Responsive Classroom approach and starting each day with a classroom “Morning Meeting”. The Morning Meeting is a great way to start the day, engage students and promote a sense of community within your classroom. However, a Morning Meeting wall can take up a lot of space leaving little room for student work, instructional materials or anchor charts.

Example Morning Meeting Bulletin Board:

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The Solution: Go Digital

If you have a projector then definitely go digital! By having a digital Morning Meeting wall, you are not only saving space but you also allowing students to:

  1. Collaborate by adding questions
  2. Archive information to review as the year progresses
  3. Read teacher posts (and of course Bitmojis)
  4. Edit/Revise questions for the meeting
  5. Publish learning
  6. Share with parents, co-teachers, administrators, and collaborators

Bookmark the digital Morning Meeting wall and pull it up on your whiteboard as needed throughout the day. And, share the wall with students via Google Classroom, Seesaw, e-mail etc. to have the reflect, comment, or collaborate on the digital bulletin board.

Example Google Slides Morning Meeting Wall

Many teachers feel Google Slides would be the best tool for creating a Morning Meeting Wall as you may copy and paste the wall onto a new slide, and share walls with teachers and parents in Google Classroom. And, you get your wall space back!

Template for Editing

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1yZAKKoQdbL2ohFMmz6zXYVBNhlrvDptgsh3fTkQKQsc/template/preview

Have you gone digital with your Morning Meeting wall?

Add Streaming Video to Google Drawings!

Recently, I have been using Google Drawings to create #HyperDrawings. But, I did not think it was possible to embed video into the Google Drawing! Tonight, I accidentally discovered that it is really easy to do!

Step 1: Insert a Video into Google Slides (Insert-Video)

Step 2: Click on Video- Copy (Ctrl C)

Step 3: Go to Google Drawings

Step 4: Paste (Ctrl V)

You now can click on the video in Google Drawings and it will STREAM!

Check out my tutorial to learn how:

HyperDrawings: Creating AMAZING Flipped and Blended Learning Activities for Math Class.

Over the last few months, Twitter has been erupting with posts from educators that are excited about HyperDocs. However, as I started coaching my teachers in best practices for creating and using HyperDocs, I discovered that Google Drawings seems to be my preferred G Suite app to use for math instruction. There are so many possibilities when it comes to creating amazing flipped or blended learning materials!

Here’s why I prefer HyperDrawings:

  1. You can embed YouTube Videos! Yes! Just copy video inserted into Google Slides into your Google Drawing! (See tutorial video below)
  2. You can add the directions and assignments in the blank space next to the canvas.
  3. The canvas is an amazing area for students and teachers to demonstrate understanding, solve problems, create screencasts, and use virtual manipulatives.
  4. You can easily add Bitmoji stickers and clipart by dragging them into the blank space next to the canvas.
  5. Students can collaborate and receive feedback using the Comment and Share Tools.
  6. Students can research using the Explore Tool.
  7. Google Keep is now integrated into Google Drawings.

Example of a HyperDrawing used for Flipped or Blended Learning

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(Click here to View/Make a Copy of Example HyperDrawing)

HyperDrawings: Not Just a Drawing with Links

When I think of using HyperDrawings in the math classroom, I am NOT just talking about creating a drawing and adding hyperlinks. They HyperDrawings should be engaging!

HyperDrawing activities should ask students to use the following skills:

Skill

Example Tool

1) Activate Prior Knowledge Vocaroo, QR Codes, Google Docs, Padlet
2) Explore YouTube, screencasts, posters, websites
3) Create Google Drawings! Add links to: Google Slides, Powtoon, WeVideo, BrainPOP Make-A-Movie, screencasts, Popplet
4) Share Padlet Wall, Google Classroom, SeeSaw, Comments, Email, Google Slides, Google Drive
5) Self-Assess  Google Forms, Padlet Wall, Google Docs, blog post, portfolios, rubrics, surveys, Kahoot, Quizziz, Formative

 

Rubric for Evaluating Your HyperDocs/HyperDrawings

Here is a new rubric I created for evaluating your HyperDocs

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More Resources:

Getting Started with Google Drawings and Math

Eric Curts has an AMAZING screencast and blog post with so much information on integrating Google Drawings into the math curriculum. Check out Eric’s Google Doc filled with resources. And, Kasey Bell at Shake Up Learning has a fabulous Google Drawing Cheat Sheet! What more do you need?

Have you ever created or used HyperDrawings?

Valentine’s Day Drag and Drop K-2

This Valentine’s Day, consider having students express their love for education by creating a customized card for their school!

Using Google Drawings, students can drag and drop tiles onto the card. Teachers may modify the tiles if needed. Students may then use the paint bucket to color the tiles, add images, change fonts, and personalize the blank tiles with their own writing

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Click here for a copy of the template. 

To Share:

  • Print the cards
  • Create QR Codes
  • Add to a Padlet Wall
  • Share to a Seesaw Classroom
  • Post to Google Classroom
  • Create a screencast video
  • Share via social media
  • Add links to websites

Happy Valentine’s Day!