Add Student Checklists to “HyperDrawings” Using Newly Integrated Google Keep

HyperDocs have been all the rage for the last couple years. My favorite G Suite tool for hyperDoc creation has always been Google Drawings. I create text boxes with opportunities for students to activate prior knowledge, engage, create, reflect, self-assess, and extend their learning within the margins or “gutter” outside of the canvas. However, there are so many steps in some of my hyperDocs that I have noticed students may accidentally skip part of their assignment. Alas, Google Keep came in to the rescue when it became fully integrated within Google Drawings!

Why Google Drawings for “HyperDocs”?

HyperDocs is the umbrella term for any tool within the G Suite Application that allows you to create inquiry-based, self-paced, differentiated student assignments. I really enjoy Google Drawings as it allows students to manipulate shapes and images in order to create a visual presentation. It also allows teachers to add video clips, directions in the margins or “gutter”, and Google Keep Notes. This really makes Google Keep a “one-stop-shop” for many of my activities.

Why Use Google Keep with HyperDrawings

Here’s an example of a hyperDrawing I created for students to learn about and create line-plots. Notice how Google Keep appears along-side the right margin. Immediately, I started integrating Google Keep as a simple way for students to track their progress as they complete their hyperDrawing. Students may check off each step or activity as it is completed. Once finished, students may then save their image as a JPG and upload their final product to the Google Keep Note. Finally, I can archive my feedback by creating hashtags for the assignments and student names.

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Step 1: Create the checklist in Google Keep

Step 2: Label the student and assignment name

Step 3: Add the student as the collaborator

Step 4: The student opens Google Drawings and then goes to Tools-Google Keep

Step 5: The student checks off tasks and assignments as they are completed.

Step 6: The student saves their Google Drawing as a JPEG and then uploads the image to the Google Keep Note.

Step 7: The teacher provides feedback and archives the notes.

In Summary

There are so many innovative and amazing ways to use Google Keep. Sometimes you just need to use the tool for what it was originally created for…….a task list 🙂

Do your students use a checklist while completing hyperDocs?